Emma spoke with David Lunn, financial planner and Principal at Lifestyle Wealth Partners.

Are you an accidental business person? I am! I studied, worked for the public and private sector, decided to become a sole trader, and now I spend more time running and expanding my business than I do clinical work.

Accidental business people might be good at rolling with the punches and making a success of their expertise, but you probably haven't thought too much about financing your retirement.

It may seem a long way off, but retirement can be a shock when you're used to a steady and generous income stream. How are you going to keep up that standard of living when the stream is cut off?

Future planning is important. Like any goal, you need to set out to achieve it.

You want to be making decisions that benefit your business now and in the future.

In your corner, you'll need a financial planner or a good accountant who can understand your goals and objectives. A compliance accountant may not be invested in your vision, so make sure you find someone who will work alongside you.

Having the correct financial structure is imperative when it comes to asset protection. You'll need a firebreak between your private wealth assets and at-risk assets.

When it comes to tax, if you're not structured properly at the start of your business venture, it can be expensive to restructure and get things where they need to be.

Don't stress about locking yourself in-for-life to a set-up that may not be right for tomorrow. David says that as a financial planner, he aims for flexibility in any structure he works on with his clients.

It's really important to me that despite my business, my priority is my kids – and I know I'm not alone in that constant battle! I need my work and home life to be in sync.

With your own retirement plan you should consider synchronicity with growing your business, and your personal goals. Your personal values are important in this big picture, and you can future-plan a structure that will suit both.

If you want to future plan, David Lunn is one resource you can find at www.lifestylewealthpartners.com.au - I've also shared a link to his business on our facebook group HR and leadership skills for aussie health practitioners.

Good luck!

emma-spencer-bio

Emma Spencer

Emma is a Clinical Psychologist who has a special interest in the assessment and treatment of children, adolescents and families and peri-natal care.  Her background has been varied and included employment within hospital and community settings, both public and private.

Emma also worked for a number of years in consulting, as a trainer, project manager, neuropsychological assessor and also provided employment selection and transition services.

Emma chatted with Consulting Psychologist Heizy Serrels about the three top tips for recruitment interviewing.

Hiring the right people for your business is so important, and here's some things you can do to hire like a pro.

Do you remember psych 101 and learning about primacy and recency bias? We tend to remember the first and last person we spoke to and blur the in-between. Keep notes on each candidate so you can properly reflect on each.

I like to conduct interviews with another person so that together we can reflect on who we've spoken to, and remind one other of each candidate's strengths and challenge areas.

Suppress the instinct to make a hire straight away! Come back to your notes so you don't overlook a strong candidate that falls outside of cognitive bias.

Also - don’t forget comparison bias. You might estimate a candidate to be of a higher quality if the person interviewed before them was of poor standard. Going back to those helpful notes will ensure your decision making is reflective not reactive.

Beware the interview star!

You know that person who is charming, has all the right answers, basically nails the interview process – but when it comes to the crunch, falls flat in the role?

We all like to be heard, so if you're doing too much talking in the interview chances are you're going to feel good about the candidate who patiently listened to you for an hour.

Avoid being dazzled by completing proper reference checking. Gather data and evidence to back up your decision.

Watch the language being used by a candidate – are they speaking theoretically or from experience? You want to know they can do what they should be doing, not just talk about it.

Finally, when you're tired, you're not at your best! Don't fall into the trap of shoehorning your interviews into "downtime” like lunch breaks or after closing time.

When we're tired we're more immediately critical, and more prone to cognitive bias.

You need to make time for interviewing at a time you're at your sharpest, and have an open mind.

So next time you're hiring – be aware of bias, beware the interview star, and beware of your own exhaustion! You're going to need to make considered decisions, not reactive ones.

We have a slew of info each month with the A-Z of leadership on HR and Leadership Skills for Aussie Health Practice Owners. Follow us on Facebook.

emma-spencer-bio

Emma Spencer

Emma is a Clinical Psychologist who has a special interest in the assessment and treatment of children, adolescents and families and peri-natal care.  Her background has been varied and included employment within hospital and community settings, both public and private.

Emma also worked for a number of years in consulting, as a trainer, project manager, neuropsychological assessor and also provided employment selection and transition services.

Emma spoke with Visibility Coach Dave Fuller about how to excel at blogging.

If you're like me, you're very capable at writing a blog and you have all the information required, but you sit down to do it and you're just...stuck.  Or you start up and then lose the momentum to keep going.

It doesn't need to be like this!

Dave Fuller is a visibility coach so he's able to advise on how your business can be more easily  "found".

Dave says that if there was one silver bullet to being found, it's blogging!

Blogging helps with directing people to your website due to key words and phrases. It's also an opportunity to present yourself as a knowledge expert.

Where do you start?

The number one tip to being a successful blogger is this; every question you're asked as a professional is a potential blog.

Keep a notepad on your desk or by your phone and every time you're asked a question – write it down! That's the title for your next blog.

In the course of your work you may see the same challenges arise again and again for different clients. You're able to advise on those challenges – and that's another blog.

You could write how-to guides, do product reviews, provide cheat sheets and checklists, transcribe interviews or videos. There is endless content you can draw from in the course of your work.

Don't worry too much about keywords. Key phrases are more relevant to SEO, and by virtue of the fact that you’re churning out regular content, those key phrases will be there.

Make sure you write as 'you', but using the language that will resonate with your audience.

A rule of thumb is 'one idea, one page’ - keep it to one idea per blog.

As with essay writing there's a structure you should follow – a headline to engage your audience, sub-heading to explain a little more about what the blog is about, then the body of text, and a final wrap up including a call-to-action which could be signing up to a mailing list, following for more content, or purchasing something.

So that being said, write as you would speak, keep it to one thought per blog, and please make sure you are following HR and Leadership Skills for Aussie Health Practice Owners on Facebook for more content to support your business.

emma-spencer-bio

Emma Spencer

Emma is a Clinical Psychologist who has a special interest in the assessment and treatment of children, adolescents and families and peri-natal care.  Her background has been varied and included employment within hospital and community settings, both public and private.

Emma also worked for a number of years in consulting, as a trainer, project manager, neuropsychological assessor and also provided employment selection and transition services.

Emma spoke with secret guru and recruitment consultant Renee Hamilton  

Filling positions vacant within your allied health practice can feel like a full-time job in itself, but a recruitment consultant help! A consultant should feel like an extension of yourself, some who you can partner with and who will fulfil an 'end-to-end' service.

The beginning of that service is a comprehensive briefing to find out what you need. An agency will have a pool of candidates who have been interviewed, some even tried and tested! From that briefing alone you could have a shortlist ready to go.

Not all agencies are created equal. Renee's advice is to stay away from the bigger players and find a specialised agency that works specifically within your field. Larger agencies may have a team that works within your industry however a boutique agency has a sole focus on candidates relevant to you and your business, so you're likely to get a higher quality of candidate.

You're probably wondering how much this all costs?

For a permanent employee it's a percentage of the total remuneration package, and for a specialist agency you can expect that to be 15-20%. The other option is a retained search in which a one-third retainer is paid upfront, the second third at shortlist stage, and the final third when the right candidate is found. In addition, agencies will have standard fees upfront but will provide options to lessen those fees if it means an agency can have exclusivity.

To get the best out of working with a recruiter, make sure you're clear on what you want from a role, have a position description, qualifications required, and consider the culture fit of your workplace and the type of person you might be looking for.

You'll also need a salary range.

With the 'end-to-end' service an agency provides, they will check in with you and with the successful candidate around the standard probation time to make sure both sides are happy with the appointment, and if not – most agencies do provide a replacement guarantee. This peace of mind goes a long way to justifying the service fees!

Good luck on your next hire, and I would love to hear about any experience you've had working with an agency!

emma-spencer-bio

Emma Spencer

Emma is a Clinical Psychologist who has a special interest in the assessment and treatment of children, adolescents and families and peri-natal care.  Her background has been varied and included employment within hospital and community settings, both public and private.

Emma also worked for a number of years in consulting, as a trainer, project manager, neuropsychological assessor and also provided employment selection and transition services.