Filling Maternity Leave Positions

One type of leave that’s always a happy time for the office is when someone goes on maternity leave!

However, it does pose the challenge of finding suitable cover which can be tricky since it’s temporary.

You've got three options when it comes to mat leave fill.

First and often easiest is to chat with current staff and see if they have the capacity to increase their hours or help out at all. Current staff should be your first port of call.

The second option is the most traditional - advertise! Put an ad out for a maternity locum. The challenge here is the standard of applications, so you have to make the job attractive to someone who would possess the criteria you require.

A non-traditional approach with the traditional job ad is where you advertise. I always advertise on seek, however I’ve made four hires by also posting the job on my local buy swap and sell facebook groups! That’s been my biggest secret to success in getting people into support roles.

Finally, use an agency. There is an expense but for the headache a temp agency will cure, I think it’s worth it. It's a valuable relationship to have for staffing needs that come up from time to time. I’d just say find a specialist agency who are experts in your field.

To find an agency, I’ve gone with word of mouth in the past, but your best rule of thumb is to chat with three and pick your favourite.

So there you go! Three solutions to your mat leave cover needs.

I’d love to hear if you have a non-traditional place to post job ads! Let me know via @emmaspencer on instagram, or through the HR and Leadership Skills for Aussie Health Practice owners Facebook group.

emma-spencer-bio

Emma Spencer

Emma is a Clinical Psychologist who has a special interest in the assessment and treatment of children, adolescents and families and peri-natal care.  Her background has been varied and included employment within hospital and community settings, both public and private.

Emma also worked for a number of years in consulting, as a trainer, project manager, neuropsychological assessor and also provided employment selection and transition services.

Tips for recruiting.

Recruiting is a very time consuming and at times very stressful part of running a business. Am I right?!

When you are going out to market and advertising for a position, the very first thing you need to do is think about the role and how are you going to go about implementing your recruitment strategy.

Do you do psychometric testing when you recruit?

If you’re hiring for a role that includes people management, I would do a personality or motivational assessment as part of your recruiting because you really want someone in that role who displays specific characteristics.

Will you start your recruiting with a phone screening, if so what will that look like?

Will you start with a group interview and then follow up with individual interviews?

Will you ensure to include scenario based questions?

Will there be behavioural questions tied in with the deliverables of the advertised role?

You could consider a panel for interviewing, in which case you’d need to determine who will sit on the panel.

Don’t be afraid to reach out within your network! I recently hired an OT for my business, so invited a former colleague to help me recruit. She was able to assess the specific OT qualities and experience that I am not across.

When hiring, most clinicians will follow the traditional route of putting out an ad, then interviewing. However if you think about some of the considerations above, you’re able to make the process more streamlined and efficient by considering the role and how the recruitment process could look in order to find the right candidate.

If you go in with the right strategy, you’re able to make candidates more specific, and save time.

Do you have a tried and tested truck for effective recruitment? Share it with the facebook group - HR and Leadership Skills for Aussie Health Practice Owners, or connect with me - @emmaspencer on instagram.

emma-spencer-bio

Emma Spencer

Emma is a Clinical Psychologist who has a special interest in the assessment and treatment of children, adolescents and families and peri-natal care.  Her background has been varied and included employment within hospital and community settings, both public and private.

Emma also worked for a number of years in consulting, as a trainer, project manager, neuropsychological assessor and also provided employment selection and transition services.

Employee Incentive Programs.

It seems that everybody I know in business right now are really struggling with finding the right people for their team.

Sometimes you interview someone and you know they’re not right, other times they are the perfect candidate - so perfect in fact, that you’re not the only business pitching for their skills!

This is where employee incentives can make you the employer of choice.

Incentive programs are great for staff retention and for attracting candidates.

When recruiting, an incentive program will give you a competitive advantage over other employers. It’s also something you could consider for your team to keep them happy, and maintain your place as their preferred employee.

 

What do you offer?

Options are endless, and you can tailor any incentive to suit yourself and your business.

At the point of recruiting, you may offer options for further education by including training or a fund for the employee that could go towards training. You may be able to offer a certain amount of supervision or other professional development on the job. Including the option for a financial bonus after a trial period is an attractive option to job-seekers.

Some companies offer break rooms with beanbags and video gaming, free lunches and tickets to concerts. No prizes for guessing which industry and which generation of workers they are trying to attract!

You might be able to offer a guarantee for holidays at Christmas and New Year. The beauty of incentives is they are really down to you and what you are able to afford a potential or current employee.

I would love to hear about any incentives you offer, or have been offered that really made a job more appealing to you. Let me know at our facebook page HR and Leadership Skills for Aussie Health Practice Owners, or DM me - Emma Spencer - on Instagram.

emma-spencer-bio

Emma Spencer

Emma is a Clinical Psychologist who has a special interest in the assessment and treatment of children, adolescents and families and peri-natal care.  Her background has been varied and included employment within hospital and community settings, both public and private.

Emma also worked for a number of years in consulting, as a trainer, project manager, neuropsychological assessor and also provided employment selection and transition services.

Leadership Mindset vs Management Mindset | Emma Spencer Consulting

Your guide to being an effective leader!

What is the difference between thinking like a manager and thinking like a leader?

Well firstly, a manager thinks in the moment about tasks and their outcome. They are concerned with the here and now, deliverables, the getting things done.

Leadership mindset on the other hand is broad and considers each individual's needs and potential as well as the strategic picture of the broader objective of the organization, beyond the day to day. This is so important for those of us who are health practice owners (or small business owners) because to move our business forward, leadership thinking is what is going to achieve this.

Within an organization, some individuals are competent within their operational role meaning a manager has the space to be a leader. In the case an individual needs workplace training, a balance of manager and leader mindset will be required. If you are a large enough organization, you may have team members in key roles aimed at supporting those individuals who need a management approach. For those of you who are wearing multiple hats in your organization, getting the balance right is paramount!

To achieve an optimal outcome within a workplace, management needs to be more than just operational.  The leadership mindset tends to yield better outcomes in terms of people development and staff retention. People respond better to leadership that is inspiring and feels invested in growth as opposed to management that sees workers as a cog in a machine.

If a manager fails to think and act as a leader, employees can feel micromanaged rather than empowered. For mangers, failing to think like a leader means they are bogged down with the minutia of day to day rather than the bigger picture of what is trying to be achieved and the growth and potential of your business stagnates.

That’s all very well and good, but how do we avoid staying stuck in the day to day? You can shift your thinking to be less of a manager and more of a leader.

Consider your own leadership role models and the traits they demonstrate, this will provide insight into the type of leader you'd like to be and what your values as a leader are.

If you notice you are getting “bogged down in the weeds” (i.e. stuck in the day to day), consider your organization structure, your processes and procedures, your availability, diary management. What practical steps can you take to free yourself up from the details, so you can sit more in the “vision space”.

Consider your meta habits and whether they come from a manager or leader mindset. Remember that the people you are leading will determine which mindset you need to use and when.

Ultimately, use your own insight to grow your style and keep moving your business forward.

emma-spencer-bio

Emma Spencer

Emma is a Clinical Psychologist who has a special interest in the assessment and treatment of children, adolescents and families and peri-natal care.  Her background has been varied and included employment within hospital and community settings, both public and private.

Emma also worked for a number of years in consulting, as a trainer, project manager, neuropsychological assessor and also provided employment selection and transition services.